Federer claims silverware at Indian Wells for the fifth time

Author: Shivashish Sarkar
Date: March 21, 2017

Featured image courtesy: By Christian Mesiano (Roger Federer  Uploaded by indeedous) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Federer startled everyone by winning his fifth Australian Open in January working through a tough draw and beating his arch rival Rafael Nadal in the final match. Very few would have thought the 17th seed would emerge as the triumphant one there. Roger proved everyone wrong and made a fantastic comeback to top level tennis in the most charismatic fashion. He is still completing his comeback. Last Sunday, he just won the Indian Wells masters for the fifth time in his career beating his compatriot Stan Wawrinka in the final with the score being 6-4, 7-5. The match lasted 1 hour and 20 minutes and featured some decent quality tennis.

Federer’s route to the final, match with Rafa

Federer’s draw wasn’t simple. His antidote Rafa was lurking as a potential 4th round opponent. In addition to Rafa, Kyrgios and Jack Sock were other dark horses in his path. He did have to face Rafa in the fourth round. He played his best match of the tournament against Rafa. He exhibited a breathtaking performance annihilating his opponent in 1 hour and 8 minutes with the score being 6-2, 6-3. He was unbroken on serve and won 58% of the points in the match. He hit many winners and fierce groundstrokes. His backhand was as lethal as it was during the Australian Open. His next match would have been against the anti-hero Nick Kyrgios which was eventually cancelled due to the latter’s food poisoning. His next opponent, Jack Sock, was a homeboy and capable of causing an upset. He had been on a great run this season having won 2 ATP 250 titles and reached a masters semis for the first time. The match was  too straightforward for the American crowd’s liking as Roger won 6-1, 7-6 (4) without facing a break point. It set the stage for an all-Swiss final. Roger Federer was to take on Stan Wawrinka for the title.

The final was competitive. The first set was on serve until Stan served at 4-5 trying to stay in the set. That’s when Roger managed to play a gritty return game to break Stan’s serve and take the first set 6-4. Wawrinka broke Roger’s serve in the first game of the second set and went 2-0 up. Stan hit three excellent winners in the first game. Roger broke back in the fourth game of the set to get back on serve at 2-2. On break point, he should great reflexes to unleash a forehand passing shot. There were no more breaks until Wawrinka served at 5-6. A match point came up for Roger. He found a good angle with his backhand to work with, unleashed a forehand down the line and finally played an easy volley at the net to win the championship.

An emotional Wawrinka jokingly called Roger Federer an ‘asshole’ in the runner-up speech as the two grinned in a friendly manner.

Roger just won his 25th masters title and his 5th Indian Wells title. Rafa with 28 titles and Djokovic with 30 titles are ahead of him though. He now has most number of masters 1000 finals along with Djokovic; 43 masters finals. He became the oldest man to win a masters tournament at least since 1990. Most tennis followers are just awe-struck by Roger’s brilliance at this age. He is now ranked no. 6 in the ATP rankings. He moved up 11 places since being no. 17 in January.

At the moment, Roger is no. 1 on the race rankings.

Read the full article at ‘The Continental Grip’.

 

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About the Author


Brought to you by Shivashish Sarkar, blogger at the Continental Grip.

Featuring articles on professional tennis. These articles are of various types namely, trend analyses, predictions and commentaries.


Comments

14 thoughts on “Federer claims silverware at Indian Wells for the fifth time”

  1. britbox britbox says:

    Who won a Masters title in 1990 older than Fed?

  2. britboxWho won a Masters title in 1990 older than Fed?​This information was taken from Wikipedia. The table there mentioned that it takes into consideration only the results that happened from the 1990 tour onwards.

  3. britbox britbox says:

    Ah, OK – so not taking the old Grand Prix events. I'm thinking only Rosewall and possibly Laver in the early 70s might have won a top category Grand Prix event older than Fed.

  4. JesuslookslikeBorg says:

    laver defo won the last of his 9 masters equiv in 1974.. so same age roughly as Federer 35.

    some wct tourney called 'palm desert' in march 1974;; which was one of the 9 that year:scratch:

  5. El Dude says:

    Laver (born August 9, 1938) won two Grand Prix titles in 1974: Philadelphia (January) and Las Vegas (May), so was 35 years and 9+ months old when he won his last Masters level title.

    Ken Rosewall (born Nov 2, 1934) won his last in 1971: US Pro in Chestnut Hill/Boston (August), so was 36 years and about 9 months.

    Older than both of them was Pancho Gonzales (born May 9, 1928) who won the LA Pacific Southwest Open in September of 1971; Pancho was 43 years old (!), defeating a 19-year old by the name of Jimmy Connors in the final.

  6. britbox britbox says:
    El Dude

    Laver (born August 9, 1938) won two Grand Prix titles in 1974: Philadelphia (January) and Las Vegas (May), so was 35 years and 9+ months old when he won his last Masters level title.

    Ken Rosewall (born Nov 2, 1934) won his last in 1971: US Pro in Chestnut Hill/Boston (August), so was 36 years and about 9 months.

    Older than both of them was Pancho Gonzales (born May 9, 1928) who won the LA Pacific Southwest Open in September of 1971; Pancho was 43 years old (!), defeating a 19-year old by the name of Jimmy Connors in the final.

    Good find on Pancho. Can't see Federer toppling that record.

  7. Federberg says:

    ^Not exactly open era though. World of difference imho, not that I care to make a comparison..

  8. britbox britbox says:
    Federberg

    ^Not exactly open era though. World of difference imho, not that I care to make a comparison..

    That one was. Open Era started in 69, Pancho just caught the begin of it and won that Grand Prix level event in 71.

  9. Federberg says:
    britbox

    That one was. Open Era started in 69, Pancho just caught the begin of it and won that Grand Prix level event in 71.

    understood

  10. JesuslookslikeBorg says:

    grand prix had different levels of tourney ratings as well as rival tour of wct..(plus the NTL). :wacko: each year tourneys could change categories depending on whatever whatever.

    that's what I get for poasting when I'm too tired to focus..i missed out blokes like pancho and muscles.:sleep2:

  11. isabelle says:

    yesterday's players were never injured and had no surgeries…it helped them a lot
    today's players are more fragile, some of them skip a lot of tourneys/a year because poor shape

  12. Federberg says:
    isabelle

    yesterday's players were never injured and had no surgeries…it helped them a lot
    today's players are more fragile, some of them skip a lot of tourneys/a year because poor shape

    Lol! I think the vastly more physical nature of the sport has a lot to do with that

  13. El Dude says:

    The Open Era actually started in 1968, the first tournament being the British Hard Court Championships in April.

  14. Ricardo says:

    isabelleyesterday's players were never injured and had no surgeries…it helped them a lot
    today's players are more fragile, some of them skip a lot of tourneys/a year because poor shape

    players are very pampered these days…players in the past more or less suck it up and play till they can't move, different mentality too.

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